Mosaic News

Lightning, Mosaic Company Team Up in the Fight to End Hunger with Goals for Food Program

Source: Tampa Bay Lightning

TAMPA BAY – For the second year running, The Tampa Bay Lightning and The Mosaic Company have partnered to help feed Tampa Bay’s hungry. During last night’s contest against the Boston Bruins, Mosaic donated a total of $105,000 to Feeding America Tampa Bay and 14 other local food bank partners as part of the Goals for Food program.

Mosaic donated $500 for each goal made by the Lightning during each home game and $5,000 for every hat trick. The program will continue throughout the remainder of the Lightning’s home schedule as well as the 2015 Stanley Cup Playoffs.

In addition to Feeding America Tampa Bay, recipients of this year’s donation include: Meals on Wheels Tampa, Meals on Wheels Plus Manatee, ECHO, Florida Association of Food Banks, Thomas Promise, United Food Bank of Plant City, All Faith’s Food Bank, VISTE, Mulberry Service Center, Hardee Help Center, Cutting Edge, Harry Chapin Food Bank and Our Daily Bread.

“Ending hunger truly requires everyone working together to ensure that essential food reaches the tables of those who need it most,” said Bo Davis, Mosaic senior vice president of phosphate operations. ”We are extremely proud to partner with the Tampa Bay Lightning, Feeding America Tampa Bay, and other food banks throughout our operating area to make a difference in our local communities.”

This year’s donation topped the inaugural 2013-2014 contribution by more than $15,000. Fans also had an opportunity to get involved before last night’s game, providing canned goods during a food drive on Ford Thunder Alley to help fight local hunger.

In appreciation of fan support, Mosaic and the Lightning gave away co-branded drawstring bags for every three canned goods donated. With the help from all the Lightning fans, Mosaic and Feeding America Tampa Bay collected over 807 pounds of food along with over $130 worth of cash donations to help provide 1,596 meals to the one in six people in Central Florida who don’t know where or when they will get their next meal.